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Natural Home Remedies For Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

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What is Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

Natural Home Remedies For Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)Hypotension is the medical term for low blood pressure (less than 90/60).

blood pressure reading appears as two numbers. The first and higher of the two is a measure of systolic pressure, or the pressure in the arteries when the heartbeats and fills them with blood. The second number measures diastolic pressure, or the pressure in the arteries when the heart rests between beats.

 

 

 

An individual’s blood pressure is expressed as systolic/diastolic blood pressure, for example, 120/80.

  • The systolic blood pressure (the top number) represents the pressure in the arteries as the muscle of the heart contracts and pumps blood into them.
  • The diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) represents the pressure in the arteries as the muscle of the heart relaxes following its contraction.

Blood pressure always is higher when the heart is pumping (squeezing) than when it is relaxing.

The range of systolic blood pressure for most healthy adults falls between 90 and 120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Normal diastolic blood pressure ranges between 60 and 80 mm Hg. Current guidelines define normal blood pressure range as lower than 120/80. Blood pressures over 130/80 are considered high. High blood pressure increases the risk of damaging the arteries which leads to the development of:

  • Heart disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis)
  • Eye damage
  • Stroke

Low blood pressure (hypotension) is pressure so low it causes symptoms or signs due to the low flow of blood through the arteries and veins. When the flow of blood is too low to deliver enough oxygen and nutrients to vital organs such as the brain, heart, and kidney, the organs do not function normally and may be temporarily or permanently damaged.

Unlike high blood pressure, low blood pressure is defined primarily by signs and symptoms of low blood flow and not by a specific blood pressure number. Some individuals routinely may have blood pressure numbers of 90/50 with no symptoms and therefore do not have low blood pressure. However, others who normally have higher blood pressures may develop symptoms of low blood pressure if their blood pressure drops to 100/60.

In pregnancy, blood pressure tends to decrease. Normal blood pressure during pregnancy may be lower than 100/60. Blood pressure should be monitored by the obstetrician during pregnancy.

The risk of both low and high blood pressure normally increases with age due in part to normal changes during aging. In addition, blood flow to the heart muscle and the brain declines with age, often as a result of plaque buildup in blood vessels. An estimated 10% to 20% of people over age 65 have postural hypotension.

Symptoms of Low Blood Pressure

For some people, low blood pressure signals an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Fainting (syncope)Symptoms of Low Blood Pressure
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of concentration

 

 

 

Symptoms of low blood pressure due to conditions or diseases include:

  • Heart disease:Chest pain (a symptom of angina) or even a heart attack due to is insufficient blood pressure to deliver blood to the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply blood to the heart’s muscle), a person may develop.
  • Kidney disease: When insufficient blood is delivered to the kidneys, the kidneys fail to eliminate wastes from the body, for example, urea (BUN) and creatinine, and increases in their levels in the blood occur.
  • Shock: is a life-threatening condition where persistently low blood pressure causes organs such as kidney, liver, heart, lung, and brain to fail rapidly.

Cause of Low Blood Pressure

Low blood pressure has many possible causes, from lifestyle choices, to medication or an underlying health condition.

In some cases, it may just be the result of being healthy and active or a tendency you’ve inherited from your parents.

Throughout the day, it’s normal for your blood pressure to vary depending on what you’re doing.Stress at work, the temperature outside and your diet could all affect your blood pressure reading.

This is why it’s important your blood pressure is checked under similar conditions each time to ensure results are consistent.

If your blood pressure reading is low, your GP will first consider whether it has been affected by:

  • The Time of Day: Blood pressure is normally lower overnight while you’re sleeping, rises a few hours before you wake up, and continues to rise during the day, reaching its highest mid-afternoon
  • How Stressed or Relaxed you are – you have lower blood pressure the more relaxed you are
  • How much exercise you do – initially, exercise will raise your blood pressure, but if you’re healthy and exercise regularly, your blood pressure will be low when you’re resting
  • Temperature – a warm temperature may cause your blood pressure to fall
  • If you have recently eaten – blood is diverted to the gut when food needs to be digested, so the blood pressure elsewhere in your body falls

If your blood pressure is still considered low after taking these factors into account, there may be another cause. Some possibilities are explained below.

  • Pregnancy. Because the circulatory system expands rapidly during pregnancy, blood pressure is likely to drop. This is normal, and blood pressure usually returns to your pre-pregnancy level after you’ve given birth.
  • Heart problems. Some heart conditions that can lead to low blood pressure include extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), heart valve problems, heart attack and heart failure.
  • Endocrine problems. Thyroid conditions such as parathyroid disease, adrenal insufficiency (Addison’s disease), low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and, in some cases, diabetes can trigger low blood pressure.
  • Dehydration. When your body loses more water than it takes in, it can cause weakness, dizziness and fatigue. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics and strenuous exercise can lead to dehydration.
  • Blood loss. Losing a lot of blood, such as from a major injury or internal bleeding, reduces the amount of blood in your body, leading to a severe drop in blood pressure.
  • Severe infection (septicemia). When an infection in the body enters the bloodstream, it can lead to a life-threatening drop in blood pressure called septic shock.
  • Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Common triggers of this severe and potentially life-threatening reaction include foods, certain medications, insect venoms and latex. Anaphylaxis can cause breathing problems, hives, itching, a swollen throat and a dangerous drop in blood pressure.
  • Lack of nutrients in your diet. A lack of the vitamins B-12 and folate can keep your body from producing enough red blood cells (anemia), causing low blood pressure.

Types of low blood pressure

Doctors often break down low blood pressure (hypotension) into categories, depending on the causes and other factors. Some types of low blood pressure include:

  • Low blood pressure on standing up (orthostatic, or postural, hypotension).This is a sudden drop in blood pressure when you stand up from a sitting position or after lying down.Gravity causes blood to pool in your legs when you stand. Ordinarily, your body compensates by increasing your heart rate and constricting blood vessels, thereby ensuring that enough blood returns to your brain.

    But in people with orthostatic hypotension, this compensating mechanism fails and blood pressure falls, leading to dizziness, lightheadedness, blurred vision and even fainting.

    Orthostatic hypotension can occur for various reasons, including dehydration, prolonged bed rest, pregnancy, diabetes, heart problems, burns, excessive heat, large varicose veins and certain neurological disorders.

     

  • Low blood pressure after eating (postprandial hypotension). This sudden drop in blood pressure after eating affects mostly older adults.Blood flows to your digestive tract after you eat. Ordinarily, your body increases your heart rate and constricts certain blood vessels to help maintain normal blood pressure. But in some people these mechanisms fail, leading to dizziness, faintness and falls.
  • Low blood pressure from faulty brain signals (neurally mediated hypotension). This disorder, which causes a blood pressure drop after standing for long periods, mostly affects young adults and children. It seems to occur because of a miscommunication between the heart and the brain.
  • Low blood pressure due to nervous system damage (multiple system atrophy with orthostatic hypotension). Also called Shy-Drager syndrome, this rare disorder causes progressive damage to the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, breathing and digestion. It’s associated with having very high blood pressure while lying down.

Risk Factors of Low Blood Pressure

Low blood pressure (hypotension) can occur in anyone, though certain types of low blood pressure are more common depending on your age or other factors:

  • Age. Drops in blood pressure on standing or after eating occur primarily in adults older than 65. Neurally mediated hypotension primarily affects children and younger adults.
  • Medications. People who take certain medications, for example, high blood pressure medications such as alpha blockers, have a greater risk of low blood pressure.
  • Certain diseases. Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and some heart conditions put you at a greater risk of developing low blood pressure.

Natural Home Remedies For Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

Poroporo (grain sorghum or great millets)

Poroporo (Sorghum Bicolor)

Poroporo(Sorghum Bicolor): which the indigenous residents in Lagos Metropolitan Area call “poroporo“. The botanical name is “Sorghum bicolor, Family Gramineae”. It is also known as “grain sorghum” or “great millets”
The “sorghum bicolor” alias “poroporo” is an annual or perennial grass with stout culms and grows up to four meters or even more in height. This product is a cereal that grows very well in dry areas, e.g. the Northern parts of Nigeria where there is relatively low rainfall.
Up North, it is cultivated chiefly for its grain. Also, the stems are commonly used to make a sort of mat for covering door ways. Furthermore, the culms are used for fencing and hut building. However, in Lagos area, its stems are of great medicinal value. Boiled stems provide red coloured liquid that is used as tonic for anemic and general lack of vitality. among the Yoruba speaking people of Nigeria, herbalists frquently use the stems to make concoction which enhances the production of blood. Indeed, this particular agricultural product provides diverse needs for diverse cultures.
cocoa wood chips
Epo Koko (Cocoa wood Chips)
cachu
Epo Cachu (Cachu Tree Bark)
  • Epo Arira
  • Epo Amuje
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Office Address: No 3 , Tasmaq Streeet, Agboroko Off lasu Road, Iyana-Iba, Lagos
Nigeria.

 

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